What they did not want you to ever find out is that your generation, the generation born between 1980-1995, actually outnumbers the Baby Boomers. They knew that if you ever turned your eye towards political reform, you could change the world. They tried to keep you sated on vapid television shows and vapid music. They cut off your education and fed you brain candy. They took away your music and gave you Top Ten pop stations. They cut off your art and replaced it with endless reality shows for you to plug into, hoping you would sit quietly by as they ran the world. We as a society are only as strong as our weakest link. Give ‘em hell, kids. 

What they did not want you to ever find out is that your generation, the generation born between 1980-1995, actually outnumbers the Baby Boomers. They knew that if you ever turned your eye towards political reform, you could change the world. They tried to keep you sated on vapid television shows and vapid music. They cut off your education and fed you brain candy. They took away your music and gave you Top Ten pop stations. They cut off your art and replaced it with endless reality shows for you to plug into, hoping you would sit quietly by as they ran the world. We as a society are only as strong as our weakest link. Give ‘em hell, kids. 

whb2:

Daisy Bates (1914 - 1999)
The driving force behind Daisy Bates activism was the rape and murder of her mother by three white men. Her mothers body was found by some young men who were fishing on the lake where the body was tossed.
Just over 50 years ago, a rock shattered the picture window of a light-brick house in Little Rock, Ark.
A note was tied to it that read: “Stone this time. Dynamite next.”
The house belonged to Daisy and L.C. Bates.
The couple led efforts to end segregation in Arkansas — on buses, in libraries and in the public schools.
On Monday, the nation will mark 50 years since black students integrated Central High School in Little Rock.
“Mrs. Bates was the person for the moment,” says Annie Abrams, a friend of Daisy Bates who was one of many black residents active at the time of the crisis.
“Daisy Bates was the poster child of black resistance. She was a quarterback, the coach. We were the players,” says Ernest Green, one of the Little Rock Nine, the group of students who integrated Central High School.
“She was conditioned to know that the civil rights movement was moving forward,” Sybil Jordan Hampton, one of the first African American students to graduate from Central High, says. Daisy Bates helped drive the movement in Little Rock.
Challenging AuthorityBates and her husband, L.C., were a team: She was the president of the Arkansas NAACP; he was its regional director. He was the publisher of the largest black newspaper in the state; she was his star reporter.
“The reason they were larger than life … Daisy and L.C. were always challenging whatever the prevailing attitude of white authority, of segregation, of restrictions of Jim Crow,” Green says
The story began in 1954 when the Supreme Court called for an end to segregated schools.Daisy Bates and the NAACP took the Little Rock school board to court.At the time, Green was attending Dunbar High School, the all-black in Little Rock.“Daisy was in the papers indicating that she was going to challenge the Little Rock School Board to adhere to the ‘54 decision. So the reason that they put together this plan was because Daisy forced them to put the plan together.”
Recruiting Students to Go FirstThe plan could work only if there were students — children really — willing to be the first to possibly face violence and defy the segregationists.Daisy Bates helped recruit them, bright kids the school board couldn’t turn down.“I’ve known Ms. Bates since I was probably two years old and I was a paper carrier for their newspaper from the time I was six,” says Hampton. She was one of the children considered, though she wasn’t selected as one of the original nine.
“I remember that she talked to my parents at an NAACP meeting,” Hampton says. “And she told my parents that she felt that my brother and I both would be good candidates. And she said to my parents that she hoped that she would have their support in our stepping forward.”
Daisy Bates did win some parents over — even as the school board was pressuring them to keep their children at the all-black high school.
Star Quality“You really needed a woman to go and talk with families and to give the assurance that the students were going to have a touch point of comfort,” Hampton says. “But she also was a very beautiful woman and the national press and other people found it just wonderful to have this star-quality black woman.”
Bates wore high heels and stylish dresses, and her friend Annie Abrams recalls her as one of the most glamorous, sophisticated black women in town.
Bates had no children of her own, but she was “hungry for children and children were attracted to her because she was a Lena Horne in our town.”It was unusual, in an era when black leaders were almost always men, for a black woman to take a leading role — especially in a drama that was playing out on the national stage.
‘Blood Will Run in the Streets’The showdown came in the fall of 1957.Arkansas Gov. Orval Faubus vowed “blood will run in the streets” if black students tried to enter Central High.
On the first day of school, Faubus ordered the Arkansas National Guard to turn the students away. Some two weeks passed and the nation waited to see what President Eisenhower would do.
Sending in the TroopsMinniejean Brown Trickey and Ernest Greene, two of the Little Rock Nine, remember the scene inside Daisy Bates’ house.
“The house was buzzing with media and people in and out,” Trickey says. “Things were happening. I mean, [civil rights lawyer] Thurgood Marshall was his amazing self. He explained things to us at a certain point and there were quite a few great minds there who were passing on information and laughing, talking.”
Green adds, “What I remember at Ms. Bates’ house is that you had all of this drama going on, but we were still teenagers. We were worried about how we were going to look getting into the jeep. Why couldn’t we have two jeeps, instead of one. And Daisy said: ‘Look, this is a very important moment. The fact that the president of the United States has sent the United States Army here to escort you into school means that this government is finally serious about school desegregation.’”
Eisenhower had acted, sending in the 101st Airborne to escort five boys and four girls to high school.
The next days and weeks, Daisy Bates’ house was still headquarters for the Little Rock Nine.
By week’s end, Central High had been integrated.Green — the only senior in the group — graduated the following spring.Martin Luther King Jr. attended the graduation ceremony. Daisy Bates could not. Her face and name were better-known in the city than King’s, and her presence might have stirred violence.
A Complicated LegacyFifty years later, her legacy is complicated.Trickey, one of the Little Rock Nine, says that Bates, who wrote a book in 1962, took too much credit for her role in the drama.“Actually I think she has in her writing expanded what her role was with us,” Trickey says. “And part of that is unfortunate because she emerged as the spokesperson for the Little Rock Nine. And our parents, by and large, were silenced.“I’ll tell you one thing: it was my dad who lost his job,” Trickey says. “It was my mother who got the terror calls. It was my mother who was frightened for my life, and they were the heroes of this.”Central High graduate Sybil Jordan Hampton thinks Daisy Bates was also heroic.“Mrs. Bates was an extraordinarily complex woman,” Jordan says. “An incident thrust her into the forefront of a movement. And I always have felt that Mrs. Bates was a tragic figure.”Fifty years on, the woman who had been at the center of the Little Rock movement is barely remembered. Her home, where it all happened, was nearly lost after her husband passed away and money was tight.
Daisy Bates died in 1999. She became the first — and still only — African-American to lie in state in the Arkansas Capitol, the same building once occupied by Gov. Faubus.On that same day, the Little Rock Nine were honored at the White House by Bill Clinton, the president from Arkansas.
by Juan Williams
http://www.itvs.org/films/daisy-bates
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=14563865
Zoom Info
whb2:

Daisy Bates (1914 - 1999)
The driving force behind Daisy Bates activism was the rape and murder of her mother by three white men. Her mothers body was found by some young men who were fishing on the lake where the body was tossed.
Just over 50 years ago, a rock shattered the picture window of a light-brick house in Little Rock, Ark.
A note was tied to it that read: “Stone this time. Dynamite next.”
The house belonged to Daisy and L.C. Bates.
The couple led efforts to end segregation in Arkansas — on buses, in libraries and in the public schools.
On Monday, the nation will mark 50 years since black students integrated Central High School in Little Rock.
“Mrs. Bates was the person for the moment,” says Annie Abrams, a friend of Daisy Bates who was one of many black residents active at the time of the crisis.
“Daisy Bates was the poster child of black resistance. She was a quarterback, the coach. We were the players,” says Ernest Green, one of the Little Rock Nine, the group of students who integrated Central High School.
“She was conditioned to know that the civil rights movement was moving forward,” Sybil Jordan Hampton, one of the first African American students to graduate from Central High, says. Daisy Bates helped drive the movement in Little Rock.
Challenging AuthorityBates and her husband, L.C., were a team: She was the president of the Arkansas NAACP; he was its regional director. He was the publisher of the largest black newspaper in the state; she was his star reporter.
“The reason they were larger than life … Daisy and L.C. were always challenging whatever the prevailing attitude of white authority, of segregation, of restrictions of Jim Crow,” Green says
The story began in 1954 when the Supreme Court called for an end to segregated schools.Daisy Bates and the NAACP took the Little Rock school board to court.At the time, Green was attending Dunbar High School, the all-black in Little Rock.“Daisy was in the papers indicating that she was going to challenge the Little Rock School Board to adhere to the ‘54 decision. So the reason that they put together this plan was because Daisy forced them to put the plan together.”
Recruiting Students to Go FirstThe plan could work only if there were students — children really — willing to be the first to possibly face violence and defy the segregationists.Daisy Bates helped recruit them, bright kids the school board couldn’t turn down.“I’ve known Ms. Bates since I was probably two years old and I was a paper carrier for their newspaper from the time I was six,” says Hampton. She was one of the children considered, though she wasn’t selected as one of the original nine.
“I remember that she talked to my parents at an NAACP meeting,” Hampton says. “And she told my parents that she felt that my brother and I both would be good candidates. And she said to my parents that she hoped that she would have their support in our stepping forward.”
Daisy Bates did win some parents over — even as the school board was pressuring them to keep their children at the all-black high school.
Star Quality“You really needed a woman to go and talk with families and to give the assurance that the students were going to have a touch point of comfort,” Hampton says. “But she also was a very beautiful woman and the national press and other people found it just wonderful to have this star-quality black woman.”
Bates wore high heels and stylish dresses, and her friend Annie Abrams recalls her as one of the most glamorous, sophisticated black women in town.
Bates had no children of her own, but she was “hungry for children and children were attracted to her because she was a Lena Horne in our town.”It was unusual, in an era when black leaders were almost always men, for a black woman to take a leading role — especially in a drama that was playing out on the national stage.
‘Blood Will Run in the Streets’The showdown came in the fall of 1957.Arkansas Gov. Orval Faubus vowed “blood will run in the streets” if black students tried to enter Central High.
On the first day of school, Faubus ordered the Arkansas National Guard to turn the students away. Some two weeks passed and the nation waited to see what President Eisenhower would do.
Sending in the TroopsMinniejean Brown Trickey and Ernest Greene, two of the Little Rock Nine, remember the scene inside Daisy Bates’ house.
“The house was buzzing with media and people in and out,” Trickey says. “Things were happening. I mean, [civil rights lawyer] Thurgood Marshall was his amazing self. He explained things to us at a certain point and there were quite a few great minds there who were passing on information and laughing, talking.”
Green adds, “What I remember at Ms. Bates’ house is that you had all of this drama going on, but we were still teenagers. We were worried about how we were going to look getting into the jeep. Why couldn’t we have two jeeps, instead of one. And Daisy said: ‘Look, this is a very important moment. The fact that the president of the United States has sent the United States Army here to escort you into school means that this government is finally serious about school desegregation.’”
Eisenhower had acted, sending in the 101st Airborne to escort five boys and four girls to high school.
The next days and weeks, Daisy Bates’ house was still headquarters for the Little Rock Nine.
By week’s end, Central High had been integrated.Green — the only senior in the group — graduated the following spring.Martin Luther King Jr. attended the graduation ceremony. Daisy Bates could not. Her face and name were better-known in the city than King’s, and her presence might have stirred violence.
A Complicated LegacyFifty years later, her legacy is complicated.Trickey, one of the Little Rock Nine, says that Bates, who wrote a book in 1962, took too much credit for her role in the drama.“Actually I think she has in her writing expanded what her role was with us,” Trickey says. “And part of that is unfortunate because she emerged as the spokesperson for the Little Rock Nine. And our parents, by and large, were silenced.“I’ll tell you one thing: it was my dad who lost his job,” Trickey says. “It was my mother who got the terror calls. It was my mother who was frightened for my life, and they were the heroes of this.”Central High graduate Sybil Jordan Hampton thinks Daisy Bates was also heroic.“Mrs. Bates was an extraordinarily complex woman,” Jordan says. “An incident thrust her into the forefront of a movement. And I always have felt that Mrs. Bates was a tragic figure.”Fifty years on, the woman who had been at the center of the Little Rock movement is barely remembered. Her home, where it all happened, was nearly lost after her husband passed away and money was tight.
Daisy Bates died in 1999. She became the first — and still only — African-American to lie in state in the Arkansas Capitol, the same building once occupied by Gov. Faubus.On that same day, the Little Rock Nine were honored at the White House by Bill Clinton, the president from Arkansas.
by Juan Williams
http://www.itvs.org/films/daisy-bates
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=14563865
Zoom Info
whb2:

Daisy Bates (1914 - 1999)
The driving force behind Daisy Bates activism was the rape and murder of her mother by three white men. Her mothers body was found by some young men who were fishing on the lake where the body was tossed.
Just over 50 years ago, a rock shattered the picture window of a light-brick house in Little Rock, Ark.
A note was tied to it that read: “Stone this time. Dynamite next.”
The house belonged to Daisy and L.C. Bates.
The couple led efforts to end segregation in Arkansas — on buses, in libraries and in the public schools.
On Monday, the nation will mark 50 years since black students integrated Central High School in Little Rock.
“Mrs. Bates was the person for the moment,” says Annie Abrams, a friend of Daisy Bates who was one of many black residents active at the time of the crisis.
“Daisy Bates was the poster child of black resistance. She was a quarterback, the coach. We were the players,” says Ernest Green, one of the Little Rock Nine, the group of students who integrated Central High School.
“She was conditioned to know that the civil rights movement was moving forward,” Sybil Jordan Hampton, one of the first African American students to graduate from Central High, says. Daisy Bates helped drive the movement in Little Rock.
Challenging AuthorityBates and her husband, L.C., were a team: She was the president of the Arkansas NAACP; he was its regional director. He was the publisher of the largest black newspaper in the state; she was his star reporter.
“The reason they were larger than life … Daisy and L.C. were always challenging whatever the prevailing attitude of white authority, of segregation, of restrictions of Jim Crow,” Green says
The story began in 1954 when the Supreme Court called for an end to segregated schools.Daisy Bates and the NAACP took the Little Rock school board to court.At the time, Green was attending Dunbar High School, the all-black in Little Rock.“Daisy was in the papers indicating that she was going to challenge the Little Rock School Board to adhere to the ‘54 decision. So the reason that they put together this plan was because Daisy forced them to put the plan together.”
Recruiting Students to Go FirstThe plan could work only if there were students — children really — willing to be the first to possibly face violence and defy the segregationists.Daisy Bates helped recruit them, bright kids the school board couldn’t turn down.“I’ve known Ms. Bates since I was probably two years old and I was a paper carrier for their newspaper from the time I was six,” says Hampton. She was one of the children considered, though she wasn’t selected as one of the original nine.
“I remember that she talked to my parents at an NAACP meeting,” Hampton says. “And she told my parents that she felt that my brother and I both would be good candidates. And she said to my parents that she hoped that she would have their support in our stepping forward.”
Daisy Bates did win some parents over — even as the school board was pressuring them to keep their children at the all-black high school.
Star Quality“You really needed a woman to go and talk with families and to give the assurance that the students were going to have a touch point of comfort,” Hampton says. “But she also was a very beautiful woman and the national press and other people found it just wonderful to have this star-quality black woman.”
Bates wore high heels and stylish dresses, and her friend Annie Abrams recalls her as one of the most glamorous, sophisticated black women in town.
Bates had no children of her own, but she was “hungry for children and children were attracted to her because she was a Lena Horne in our town.”It was unusual, in an era when black leaders were almost always men, for a black woman to take a leading role — especially in a drama that was playing out on the national stage.
‘Blood Will Run in the Streets’The showdown came in the fall of 1957.Arkansas Gov. Orval Faubus vowed “blood will run in the streets” if black students tried to enter Central High.
On the first day of school, Faubus ordered the Arkansas National Guard to turn the students away. Some two weeks passed and the nation waited to see what President Eisenhower would do.
Sending in the TroopsMinniejean Brown Trickey and Ernest Greene, two of the Little Rock Nine, remember the scene inside Daisy Bates’ house.
“The house was buzzing with media and people in and out,” Trickey says. “Things were happening. I mean, [civil rights lawyer] Thurgood Marshall was his amazing self. He explained things to us at a certain point and there were quite a few great minds there who were passing on information and laughing, talking.”
Green adds, “What I remember at Ms. Bates’ house is that you had all of this drama going on, but we were still teenagers. We were worried about how we were going to look getting into the jeep. Why couldn’t we have two jeeps, instead of one. And Daisy said: ‘Look, this is a very important moment. The fact that the president of the United States has sent the United States Army here to escort you into school means that this government is finally serious about school desegregation.’”
Eisenhower had acted, sending in the 101st Airborne to escort five boys and four girls to high school.
The next days and weeks, Daisy Bates’ house was still headquarters for the Little Rock Nine.
By week’s end, Central High had been integrated.Green — the only senior in the group — graduated the following spring.Martin Luther King Jr. attended the graduation ceremony. Daisy Bates could not. Her face and name were better-known in the city than King’s, and her presence might have stirred violence.
A Complicated LegacyFifty years later, her legacy is complicated.Trickey, one of the Little Rock Nine, says that Bates, who wrote a book in 1962, took too much credit for her role in the drama.“Actually I think she has in her writing expanded what her role was with us,” Trickey says. “And part of that is unfortunate because she emerged as the spokesperson for the Little Rock Nine. And our parents, by and large, were silenced.“I’ll tell you one thing: it was my dad who lost his job,” Trickey says. “It was my mother who got the terror calls. It was my mother who was frightened for my life, and they were the heroes of this.”Central High graduate Sybil Jordan Hampton thinks Daisy Bates was also heroic.“Mrs. Bates was an extraordinarily complex woman,” Jordan says. “An incident thrust her into the forefront of a movement. And I always have felt that Mrs. Bates was a tragic figure.”Fifty years on, the woman who had been at the center of the Little Rock movement is barely remembered. Her home, where it all happened, was nearly lost after her husband passed away and money was tight.
Daisy Bates died in 1999. She became the first — and still only — African-American to lie in state in the Arkansas Capitol, the same building once occupied by Gov. Faubus.On that same day, the Little Rock Nine were honored at the White House by Bill Clinton, the president from Arkansas.
by Juan Williams
http://www.itvs.org/films/daisy-bates
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=14563865
Zoom Info
whb2:

Daisy Bates (1914 - 1999)
The driving force behind Daisy Bates activism was the rape and murder of her mother by three white men. Her mothers body was found by some young men who were fishing on the lake where the body was tossed.
Just over 50 years ago, a rock shattered the picture window of a light-brick house in Little Rock, Ark.
A note was tied to it that read: “Stone this time. Dynamite next.”
The house belonged to Daisy and L.C. Bates.
The couple led efforts to end segregation in Arkansas — on buses, in libraries and in the public schools.
On Monday, the nation will mark 50 years since black students integrated Central High School in Little Rock.
“Mrs. Bates was the person for the moment,” says Annie Abrams, a friend of Daisy Bates who was one of many black residents active at the time of the crisis.
“Daisy Bates was the poster child of black resistance. She was a quarterback, the coach. We were the players,” says Ernest Green, one of the Little Rock Nine, the group of students who integrated Central High School.
“She was conditioned to know that the civil rights movement was moving forward,” Sybil Jordan Hampton, one of the first African American students to graduate from Central High, says. Daisy Bates helped drive the movement in Little Rock.
Challenging AuthorityBates and her husband, L.C., were a team: She was the president of the Arkansas NAACP; he was its regional director. He was the publisher of the largest black newspaper in the state; she was his star reporter.
“The reason they were larger than life … Daisy and L.C. were always challenging whatever the prevailing attitude of white authority, of segregation, of restrictions of Jim Crow,” Green says
The story began in 1954 when the Supreme Court called for an end to segregated schools.Daisy Bates and the NAACP took the Little Rock school board to court.At the time, Green was attending Dunbar High School, the all-black in Little Rock.“Daisy was in the papers indicating that she was going to challenge the Little Rock School Board to adhere to the ‘54 decision. So the reason that they put together this plan was because Daisy forced them to put the plan together.”
Recruiting Students to Go FirstThe plan could work only if there were students — children really — willing to be the first to possibly face violence and defy the segregationists.Daisy Bates helped recruit them, bright kids the school board couldn’t turn down.“I’ve known Ms. Bates since I was probably two years old and I was a paper carrier for their newspaper from the time I was six,” says Hampton. She was one of the children considered, though she wasn’t selected as one of the original nine.
“I remember that she talked to my parents at an NAACP meeting,” Hampton says. “And she told my parents that she felt that my brother and I both would be good candidates. And she said to my parents that she hoped that she would have their support in our stepping forward.”
Daisy Bates did win some parents over — even as the school board was pressuring them to keep their children at the all-black high school.
Star Quality“You really needed a woman to go and talk with families and to give the assurance that the students were going to have a touch point of comfort,” Hampton says. “But she also was a very beautiful woman and the national press and other people found it just wonderful to have this star-quality black woman.”
Bates wore high heels and stylish dresses, and her friend Annie Abrams recalls her as one of the most glamorous, sophisticated black women in town.
Bates had no children of her own, but she was “hungry for children and children were attracted to her because she was a Lena Horne in our town.”It was unusual, in an era when black leaders were almost always men, for a black woman to take a leading role — especially in a drama that was playing out on the national stage.
‘Blood Will Run in the Streets’The showdown came in the fall of 1957.Arkansas Gov. Orval Faubus vowed “blood will run in the streets” if black students tried to enter Central High.
On the first day of school, Faubus ordered the Arkansas National Guard to turn the students away. Some two weeks passed and the nation waited to see what President Eisenhower would do.
Sending in the TroopsMinniejean Brown Trickey and Ernest Greene, two of the Little Rock Nine, remember the scene inside Daisy Bates’ house.
“The house was buzzing with media and people in and out,” Trickey says. “Things were happening. I mean, [civil rights lawyer] Thurgood Marshall was his amazing self. He explained things to us at a certain point and there were quite a few great minds there who were passing on information and laughing, talking.”
Green adds, “What I remember at Ms. Bates’ house is that you had all of this drama going on, but we were still teenagers. We were worried about how we were going to look getting into the jeep. Why couldn’t we have two jeeps, instead of one. And Daisy said: ‘Look, this is a very important moment. The fact that the president of the United States has sent the United States Army here to escort you into school means that this government is finally serious about school desegregation.’”
Eisenhower had acted, sending in the 101st Airborne to escort five boys and four girls to high school.
The next days and weeks, Daisy Bates’ house was still headquarters for the Little Rock Nine.
By week’s end, Central High had been integrated.Green — the only senior in the group — graduated the following spring.Martin Luther King Jr. attended the graduation ceremony. Daisy Bates could not. Her face and name were better-known in the city than King’s, and her presence might have stirred violence.
A Complicated LegacyFifty years later, her legacy is complicated.Trickey, one of the Little Rock Nine, says that Bates, who wrote a book in 1962, took too much credit for her role in the drama.“Actually I think she has in her writing expanded what her role was with us,” Trickey says. “And part of that is unfortunate because she emerged as the spokesperson for the Little Rock Nine. And our parents, by and large, were silenced.“I’ll tell you one thing: it was my dad who lost his job,” Trickey says. “It was my mother who got the terror calls. It was my mother who was frightened for my life, and they were the heroes of this.”Central High graduate Sybil Jordan Hampton thinks Daisy Bates was also heroic.“Mrs. Bates was an extraordinarily complex woman,” Jordan says. “An incident thrust her into the forefront of a movement. And I always have felt that Mrs. Bates was a tragic figure.”Fifty years on, the woman who had been at the center of the Little Rock movement is barely remembered. Her home, where it all happened, was nearly lost after her husband passed away and money was tight.
Daisy Bates died in 1999. She became the first — and still only — African-American to lie in state in the Arkansas Capitol, the same building once occupied by Gov. Faubus.On that same day, the Little Rock Nine were honored at the White House by Bill Clinton, the president from Arkansas.
by Juan Williams
http://www.itvs.org/films/daisy-bates
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=14563865
Zoom Info
whb2:

Daisy Bates (1914 - 1999)
The driving force behind Daisy Bates activism was the rape and murder of her mother by three white men. Her mothers body was found by some young men who were fishing on the lake where the body was tossed.
Just over 50 years ago, a rock shattered the picture window of a light-brick house in Little Rock, Ark.
A note was tied to it that read: “Stone this time. Dynamite next.”
The house belonged to Daisy and L.C. Bates.
The couple led efforts to end segregation in Arkansas — on buses, in libraries and in the public schools.
On Monday, the nation will mark 50 years since black students integrated Central High School in Little Rock.
“Mrs. Bates was the person for the moment,” says Annie Abrams, a friend of Daisy Bates who was one of many black residents active at the time of the crisis.
“Daisy Bates was the poster child of black resistance. She was a quarterback, the coach. We were the players,” says Ernest Green, one of the Little Rock Nine, the group of students who integrated Central High School.
“She was conditioned to know that the civil rights movement was moving forward,” Sybil Jordan Hampton, one of the first African American students to graduate from Central High, says. Daisy Bates helped drive the movement in Little Rock.
Challenging AuthorityBates and her husband, L.C., were a team: She was the president of the Arkansas NAACP; he was its regional director. He was the publisher of the largest black newspaper in the state; she was his star reporter.
“The reason they were larger than life … Daisy and L.C. were always challenging whatever the prevailing attitude of white authority, of segregation, of restrictions of Jim Crow,” Green says
The story began in 1954 when the Supreme Court called for an end to segregated schools.Daisy Bates and the NAACP took the Little Rock school board to court.At the time, Green was attending Dunbar High School, the all-black in Little Rock.“Daisy was in the papers indicating that she was going to challenge the Little Rock School Board to adhere to the ‘54 decision. So the reason that they put together this plan was because Daisy forced them to put the plan together.”
Recruiting Students to Go FirstThe plan could work only if there were students — children really — willing to be the first to possibly face violence and defy the segregationists.Daisy Bates helped recruit them, bright kids the school board couldn’t turn down.“I’ve known Ms. Bates since I was probably two years old and I was a paper carrier for their newspaper from the time I was six,” says Hampton. She was one of the children considered, though she wasn’t selected as one of the original nine.
“I remember that she talked to my parents at an NAACP meeting,” Hampton says. “And she told my parents that she felt that my brother and I both would be good candidates. And she said to my parents that she hoped that she would have their support in our stepping forward.”
Daisy Bates did win some parents over — even as the school board was pressuring them to keep their children at the all-black high school.
Star Quality“You really needed a woman to go and talk with families and to give the assurance that the students were going to have a touch point of comfort,” Hampton says. “But she also was a very beautiful woman and the national press and other people found it just wonderful to have this star-quality black woman.”
Bates wore high heels and stylish dresses, and her friend Annie Abrams recalls her as one of the most glamorous, sophisticated black women in town.
Bates had no children of her own, but she was “hungry for children and children were attracted to her because she was a Lena Horne in our town.”It was unusual, in an era when black leaders were almost always men, for a black woman to take a leading role — especially in a drama that was playing out on the national stage.
‘Blood Will Run in the Streets’The showdown came in the fall of 1957.Arkansas Gov. Orval Faubus vowed “blood will run in the streets” if black students tried to enter Central High.
On the first day of school, Faubus ordered the Arkansas National Guard to turn the students away. Some two weeks passed and the nation waited to see what President Eisenhower would do.
Sending in the TroopsMinniejean Brown Trickey and Ernest Greene, two of the Little Rock Nine, remember the scene inside Daisy Bates’ house.
“The house was buzzing with media and people in and out,” Trickey says. “Things were happening. I mean, [civil rights lawyer] Thurgood Marshall was his amazing self. He explained things to us at a certain point and there were quite a few great minds there who were passing on information and laughing, talking.”
Green adds, “What I remember at Ms. Bates’ house is that you had all of this drama going on, but we were still teenagers. We were worried about how we were going to look getting into the jeep. Why couldn’t we have two jeeps, instead of one. And Daisy said: ‘Look, this is a very important moment. The fact that the president of the United States has sent the United States Army here to escort you into school means that this government is finally serious about school desegregation.’”
Eisenhower had acted, sending in the 101st Airborne to escort five boys and four girls to high school.
The next days and weeks, Daisy Bates’ house was still headquarters for the Little Rock Nine.
By week’s end, Central High had been integrated.Green — the only senior in the group — graduated the following spring.Martin Luther King Jr. attended the graduation ceremony. Daisy Bates could not. Her face and name were better-known in the city than King’s, and her presence might have stirred violence.
A Complicated LegacyFifty years later, her legacy is complicated.Trickey, one of the Little Rock Nine, says that Bates, who wrote a book in 1962, took too much credit for her role in the drama.“Actually I think she has in her writing expanded what her role was with us,” Trickey says. “And part of that is unfortunate because she emerged as the spokesperson for the Little Rock Nine. And our parents, by and large, were silenced.“I’ll tell you one thing: it was my dad who lost his job,” Trickey says. “It was my mother who got the terror calls. It was my mother who was frightened for my life, and they were the heroes of this.”Central High graduate Sybil Jordan Hampton thinks Daisy Bates was also heroic.“Mrs. Bates was an extraordinarily complex woman,” Jordan says. “An incident thrust her into the forefront of a movement. And I always have felt that Mrs. Bates was a tragic figure.”Fifty years on, the woman who had been at the center of the Little Rock movement is barely remembered. Her home, where it all happened, was nearly lost after her husband passed away and money was tight.
Daisy Bates died in 1999. She became the first — and still only — African-American to lie in state in the Arkansas Capitol, the same building once occupied by Gov. Faubus.On that same day, the Little Rock Nine were honored at the White House by Bill Clinton, the president from Arkansas.
by Juan Williams
http://www.itvs.org/films/daisy-bates
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=14563865
Zoom Info

whb2:

Daisy Bates (1914 - 1999)

The driving force behind Daisy Bates activism was the rape and murder of her mother by three white men. Her mothers body was found by some young men who were fishing on the lake where the body was tossed.

Just over 50 years ago, a rock shattered the picture window of a light-brick house in Little Rock, Ark.

A note was tied to it that read: “Stone this time. Dynamite next.”

The house belonged to Daisy and L.C. Bates.

The couple led efforts to end segregation in Arkansas — on buses, in libraries and in the public schools.

On Monday, the nation will mark 50 years since black students integrated Central High School in Little Rock.

“Mrs. Bates was the person for the moment,” says Annie Abrams, a friend of Daisy Bates who was one of many black residents active at the time of the crisis.

“Daisy Bates was the poster child of black resistance. She was a quarterback, the coach. We were the players,” says Ernest Green, one of the Little Rock Nine, the group of students who integrated Central High School.

“She was conditioned to know that the civil rights movement was moving forward,” Sybil Jordan Hampton, one of the first African American students to graduate from Central High, says. Daisy Bates helped drive the movement in Little Rock.

Challenging Authority
Bates and her husband, L.C., were a team: She was the president of the Arkansas NAACP; he was its regional director. He was the publisher of the largest black newspaper in the state; she was his star reporter.

“The reason they were larger than life … Daisy and L.C. were always challenging whatever the prevailing attitude of white authority, of segregation, of restrictions of Jim Crow,” Green says

The story began in 1954 when the Supreme Court called for an end to segregated schools.
Daisy Bates and the NAACP took the Little Rock school board to court.
At the time, Green was attending Dunbar High School, the all-black in Little Rock.
“Daisy was in the papers indicating that she was going to challenge the Little Rock School Board to adhere to the ‘54 decision. So the reason that they put together this plan was because Daisy forced them to put the plan together.”

Recruiting Students to Go First
The plan could work only if there were students — children really — willing to be the first to possibly face violence and defy the segregationists.
Daisy Bates helped recruit them, bright kids the school board couldn’t turn down.
“I’ve known Ms. Bates since I was probably two years old and I was a paper carrier for their newspaper from the time I was six,” says Hampton. She was one of the children considered, though she wasn’t selected as one of the original nine.

“I remember that she talked to my parents at an NAACP meeting,” Hampton says. “And she told my parents that she felt that my brother and I both would be good candidates. And she said to my parents that she hoped that she would have their support in our stepping forward.”

Daisy Bates did win some parents over — even as the school board was pressuring them to keep their children at the all-black high school.

Star Quality
“You really needed a woman to go and talk with families and to give the assurance that the students were going to have a touch point of comfort,” Hampton says. “But she also was a very beautiful woman and the national press and other people found it just wonderful to have this star-quality black woman.”

Bates wore high heels and stylish dresses, and her friend Annie Abrams recalls her as one of the most glamorous, sophisticated black women in town.

Bates had no children of her own, but she was “hungry for children and children were attracted to her because she was a Lena Horne in our town.”
It was unusual, in an era when black leaders were almost always men, for a black woman to take a leading role — especially in a drama that was playing out on the national stage.

‘Blood Will Run in the Streets’
The showdown came in the fall of 1957.
Arkansas Gov. Orval Faubus vowed “blood will run in the streets” if black students tried to enter Central High.

On the first day of school, Faubus ordered the Arkansas National Guard to turn the students away. Some two weeks passed and the nation waited to see what President Eisenhower would do.

Sending in the Troops
Minniejean Brown Trickey and Ernest Greene, two of the Little Rock Nine, remember the scene inside Daisy Bates’ house.

“The house was buzzing with media and people in and out,” Trickey says. “Things were happening. I mean, [civil rights lawyer] Thurgood Marshall was his amazing self. He explained things to us at a certain point and there were quite a few great minds there who were passing on information and laughing, talking.”

Green adds, “What I remember at Ms. Bates’ house is that you had all of this drama going on, but we were still teenagers. We were worried about how we were going to look getting into the jeep. Why couldn’t we have two jeeps, instead of one. And Daisy said: ‘Look, this is a very important moment. The fact that the president of the United States has sent the United States Army here to escort you into school means that this government is finally serious about school desegregation.’”

Eisenhower had acted, sending in the 101st Airborne to escort five boys and four girls to high school.

The next days and weeks, Daisy Bates’ house was still headquarters for the Little Rock Nine.

By week’s end, Central High had been integrated.
Green — the only senior in the group — graduated the following spring.
Martin Luther King Jr. attended the graduation ceremony. Daisy Bates could not. Her face and name were better-known in the city than King’s, and her presence might have stirred violence.

A Complicated Legacy
Fifty years later, her legacy is complicated.
Trickey, one of the Little Rock Nine, says that Bates, who wrote a book in 1962, took too much credit for her role in the drama.
“Actually I think she has in her writing expanded what her role was with us,” Trickey says. “And part of that is unfortunate because she emerged as the spokesperson for the Little Rock Nine. And our parents, by and large, were silenced.
“I’ll tell you one thing: it was my dad who lost his job,” Trickey says. “It was my mother who got the terror calls. It was my mother who was frightened for my life, and they were the heroes of this.”
Central High graduate Sybil Jordan Hampton thinks Daisy Bates was also heroic.
“Mrs. Bates was an extraordinarily complex woman,” Jordan says. “An incident thrust her into the forefront of a movement. And I always have felt that Mrs. Bates was a tragic figure.”
Fifty years on, the woman who had been at the center of the Little Rock movement is barely remembered. Her home, where it all happened, was nearly lost after her husband passed away and money was tight.

Daisy Bates died in 1999. She became the first — and still only — African-American to lie in state in the Arkansas Capitol, the same building once occupied by Gov. Faubus.
On that same day, the Little Rock Nine were honored at the White House by Bill Clinton, the president from Arkansas.

by Juan Williams

http://www.itvs.org/films/daisy-bates

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=14563865

The Soapbox Schtick: 11 Facts From 2011

think-progress:

1. The CIA is monitoring up to 5 million tweets per day

2. Income inequality in America is worse than in Ancient Rome.

3. Twenty-three straight polls find Americans overwhelmingly want to raise taxes to pay down debt.

4. 68% of millionaires support raising taxes on millionaires. 

5. Wall Street’s recession cost 1.5 million times more than securing Occupy Wall Street protests. 

6. Six Walmart heirs have the same net worth as the bottom 30% of all Americans.

7. Reagan’s ‘82 and ‘84 deficit reduction plans were 80% tax increases.

8. Since 2009, 88% of income growth went to corporate profits, just 1% to wages.

9. Average Bush tax cut this year for the 1% will exceed average income for the 99%.

10. Planned Parenthood Facts: 4 million STD tests, 1 million screenings for cervical cancer, 830,000 breast exams every year. Receives no federal money for abortion.

11. DEAD: Bin Laden, Quaddafi, and Kim Jong Il. OUSTED: Mubarak, Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, and Ali Adullah Saleh.

thedailywhat:

Occupy Movement News Update of the Day: Occupy protesters took to the streets today across the country for a day of “mass non-violent direct action” to mark the movement’s two-month anniversary.
“Morning, campers,” tweeted the official Occupy Wall Street feed at 6:35 AM, “It’s a beautiful day for revolution.” 25 minutes later, OWS officially launched the day’s first volley: An attempt to disrupt business at the New York Stock Exchange, and prevent the Opening Bell from ringing on time.
They did not succeed.
NYPD officers arrested dozens of demonstrators and scuffled with dozens more as protesters were pushed around by police officers, allegedly for blocking traffic. Long Range Acoustic Devices were reportedly used by the NYPD to disperse the crowd (see report below).

Among those arrested was retired Philadelphia Police captain Ray Lewis, who joined the protesters yesterday outside Zuccotti Park, and was participating in today’s Day of Action. 
Lauren Thorpe snapped this incredible photo of a uniformed Lewis immediately after being handcuffed by NYPD officers:

Another instantly iconic photo to emerge from the early-morning event is this snapshot of NYPD officers attempting to arrest a wheelchair-bound woman. According to The Guardian’s Paul Harris, they eventually gave up and ticketed her instead.

By 11 AM, the majority of protesters made their way to Zuccotti Park, where barricades around the occupation’s former homebase were removed, allowing hundreds of people to spill in.
Additional clashes ensued and many more people were arrested as police attempted to control the crowd and restore the barricades.
An hour and a half later, the barricades were back up, and protesters returned to the streets, marching and chanting up an down Broadway.
Police nearly lost control of protesters in Zuccotti Park for a second time a short while later, when a protester named Brandon Watts had his head bashed against the ground by several officers after he reportedly stole a policeman’s hat. (He was later charged with attempted assault and larceny.)

A New York Daily News report filed around the time of fracas referred to the scene at Zuccotti Park as “full blown mayhem.” Matters were not helped when, twenty minutes later, a protester cut an officer’s hand with a piece of glass.
By 3 PM nearly 200 people had been arrested in all, and at least 7 police offers were injured.
Protesters then launched their next offensive: Occupy The Subways. Despite initial reports, the plan was not to shut down the transit system, but merely use it to “spread stories” with the help of the People’s Mic.
“The real story for tomorrow morning’s paper was there were just not that many people out here,” said Mayor Michael Bloomberg at an afternoon presser.
But the figures swelled significantly as protesters were joined by union members on their way to “take” Foley Square ahead of the day’s final action: A march across the Brooklyn Bridge.
64 protesters, including city councilman Jumaane Williams, were arrested at the base of the bridge before the march even began. All told, some 300 people were arrested during the day’s demonstrations.

Shortly after 6:30, thousands of protesters — possibly as many as 20,000 — began to stream across the bridge carrying candles. Unlike previous events throughout the day, the BK Bridge march was notable for its peaceful nature.
Livestream below, courtesy of TheOther99:
 
Timelines: Occupy Wall Street; NYT; NYDN; The Atlantic; The Guardian; 
Elsewhere:
— Dozens of Occupy LA protesters arrested after marching through downtown, taking over Bank of America Plaza.
— In Portland, clashes between police and Occupy protesters demonstrating in support of N17.
— Occupy Detroit protesters, joined by union members, rallied outside the Coleman A. Young Municipal building.
— Hundreds of Occupy D.C. protesters marched across Key Bridge with little incident.
Further Reading/Viewing:
— 1 percenter Anne Hathaway was spotted among the protesters, holding up a sign that said “blackboards not bullets”:

— Occupy Wall Street message occupies Verizon Building; now with 100% more video.
— 26 Arrested Reporters and What They Do; related photo: journalist with visible press badge being arrest. 
— What’s a protest without a counter-protest?; see also: More on these guys.
— Classism at Occupy Wall Street? The Daily Show investigates.
[image: ows.]

I try not to blog too many irrelevant things on here, but I had to reblog this for the immense dedication of the protesters and because Anne Hathaway was among them. She is one of the most inspirational actresses, and there are few I actually admire.

thedailywhat:

Occupy Movement News Update of the Day: Occupy protesters took to the streets today across the country for a day of “mass non-violent direct action” to mark the movement’s two-month anniversary.

“Morning, campers,” tweeted the official Occupy Wall Street feed at 6:35 AM, “It’s a beautiful day for revolution.” 25 minutes later, OWS officially launched the day’s first volley: An attempt to disrupt business at the New York Stock Exchange, and prevent the Opening Bell from ringing on time.

They did not succeed.

NYPD officers arrested dozens of demonstrators and scuffled with dozens more as protesters were pushed around by police officers, allegedly for blocking traffic. Long Range Acoustic Devices were reportedly used by the NYPD to disperse the crowd (see report below).

Among those arrested was retired Philadelphia Police captain Ray Lewis, who joined the protesters yesterday outside Zuccotti Park, and was participating in today’s Day of Action. 

Lauren Thorpe snapped this incredible photo of a uniformed Lewis immediately after being handcuffed by NYPD officers:

Another instantly iconic photo to emerge from the early-morning event is this snapshot of NYPD officers attempting to arrest a wheelchair-bound woman. According to The Guardian’s Paul Harris, they eventually gave up and ticketed her instead.

By 11 AM, the majority of protesters made their way to Zuccotti Park, where barricades around the occupation’s former homebase were removed, allowing hundreds of people to spill in.

Additional clashes ensued and many more people were arrested as police attempted to control the crowd and restore the barricades.

An hour and a half later, the barricades were back up, and protesters returned to the streets, marching and chanting up an down Broadway.

Police nearly lost control of protesters in Zuccotti Park for a second time a short while later, when a protester named Brandon Watts had his head bashed against the ground by several officers after he reportedly stole a policeman’s hat. (He was later charged with attempted assault and larceny.)

A New York Daily News report filed around the time of fracas referred to the scene at Zuccotti Park as “full blown mayhem.” Matters were not helped when, twenty minutes later, a protester cut an officer’s hand with a piece of glass.

By 3 PM nearly 200 people had been arrested in all, and at least 7 police offers were injured.

Protesters then launched their next offensive: Occupy The Subways. Despite initial reports, the plan was not to shut down the transit system, but merely use it to “spread stories” with the help of the People’s Mic.

“The real story for tomorrow morning’s paper was there were just not that many people out here,” said Mayor Michael Bloomberg at an afternoon presser.

But the figures swelled significantly as protesters were joined by union members on their way to “take” Foley Square ahead of the day’s final action: A march across the Brooklyn Bridge.

64 protesters, including city councilman Jumaane Williams, were arrested at the base of the bridge before the march even began. All told, some 300 people were arrested during the day’s demonstrations.

Shortly after 6:30, thousands of protesters — possibly as many as 20,000 — began to stream across the bridge carrying candles. Unlike previous events throughout the day, the BK Bridge march was notable for its peaceful nature.

Livestream below, courtesy of TheOther99:

Timelines: Occupy Wall Street; NYT; NYDN; The Atlantic; The Guardian

Elsewhere:

— Dozens of Occupy LA protesters arrested after marching through downtown, taking over Bank of America Plaza.

— In Portland, clashes between police and Occupy protesters demonstrating in support of N17.

— Occupy Detroit protesters, joined by union members, rallied outside the Coleman A. Young Municipal building.

— Hundreds of Occupy D.C. protesters marched across Key Bridge with little incident.

Further Reading/Viewing:

— 1 percenter Anne Hathaway was spotted among the protesters, holding up a sign that said “blackboards not bullets”:

— Occupy Wall Street message occupies Verizon Building; now with 100% more video.

— 26 Arrested Reporters and What They Do; related photo: journalist with visible press badge being arrest

— What’s a protest without a counter-protest?; see also: More on these guys.

— Classism at Occupy Wall Street? The Daily Show investigates.

[image: ows.]

I try not to blog too many irrelevant things on here, but I had to reblog this for the immense dedication of the protesters and because Anne Hathaway was among them. She is one of the most inspirational actresses, and there are few I actually admire.

What do Senator Marco Rubio, immigrants for sale and $50,000 in cash have in common? Watch Axel Caballero expose Immigrants for Sale and the politicians & corporations that profit from detainee centers.

thedailywhat:

This Is All Kinds Of Wrong of the Day: In a move that is certain to stir controversy far beyond its borders, Topeka’s City Council voted yesterday to repeal the Kansas state capital’s ban on domestic battery.
The move is a purely political one: Budget cuts have compelled Shawnee County District Attorney Chad Taylor to transfer all misdemeanor domestic battery cases to the city, which has refused to handle them due to the added cost.
Interim city manager Dan Stanley believes the ban’s repeal is exactly the sort of kick in the junk the DA’s office needs to start prosecuting domestic battery cases again.
Some 30 abuse suspects have had their charges dismissed since the dispute began, with one offender being released twice.
The so-called “decriminalization” of domestic violence has stoked the ire of many local and national organizations that feel people’s lives are being risked for a game of political chicken.
“I absolutely do not understand it,” National Coalition Against Domestic Violence executive director Rita Smith told the Kansas City Star. “It’s really outrageous that they’re playing with family safety to see who blinks first. People could die while they’re waiting to straighten this out.”
Adding insult to injury, October happens to be Domestic Violence Awareness Month.
While domestic abuse remains a crime in the state of Kansas, and therefore in Topeka, with no one in the city willing to foot the bill for prosecution, it is likely cases will continue to be dismissed until city and county officials agree on a resolution.
[cjonline / kcstar.]

thedailywhat:

This Is All Kinds Of Wrong of the Day: In a move that is certain to stir controversy far beyond its borders, Topeka’s City Council voted yesterday to repeal the Kansas state capital’s ban on domestic battery.

The move is a purely political one: Budget cuts have compelled Shawnee County District Attorney Chad Taylor to transfer all misdemeanor domestic battery cases to the city, which has refused to handle them due to the added cost.

Interim city manager Dan Stanley believes the ban’s repeal is exactly the sort of kick in the junk the DA’s office needs to start prosecuting domestic battery cases again.

Some 30 abuse suspects have had their charges dismissed since the dispute began, with one offender being released twice.

The so-called “decriminalization” of domestic violence has stoked the ire of many local and national organizations that feel people’s lives are being risked for a game of political chicken.

“I absolutely do not understand it,” National Coalition Against Domestic Violence executive director Rita Smith told the Kansas City Star. “It’s really outrageous that they’re playing with family safety to see who blinks first. People could die while they’re waiting to straighten this out.”

Adding insult to injury, October happens to be Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

While domestic abuse remains a crime in the state of Kansas, and therefore in Topeka, with no one in the city willing to foot the bill for prosecution, it is likely cases will continue to be dismissed until city and county officials agree on a resolution.

[cjonline / kcstar.]