Priyanka Chopra | I Was Called a Terrorist by NFL Fans

In September 2013, Priyanka performed the kick-off song “In My City” for a Thursday night football game at the NFL in the US.

Speaking about it for the first time, Priyanka, in an interview with Wall Street Journal’s Lee Hawkins, gave a very calm and powerful response to all that hate coming her way. She also spoke about how she’s experienced and handled racism directed at her over the years.

whb2:

Daisy Bates (1914 - 1999)

The driving force behind Daisy Bates activism was the rape and murder of her mother by three white men. Her mothers body was found by some young men who were fishing on the lake where the body was tossed.

Just over 50 years ago, a rock shattered the picture window of a light-brick house in Little Rock, Ark.

A note was tied to it that read: “Stone this time. Dynamite next.”

The house belonged to Daisy and L.C. Bates.

The couple led efforts to end segregation in Arkansas — on buses, in libraries and in the public schools.

On Monday, the nation will mark 50 years since black students integrated Central High School in Little Rock.

“Mrs. Bates was the person for the moment,” says Annie Abrams, a friend of Daisy Bates who was one of many black residents active at the time of the crisis.

“Daisy Bates was the poster child of black resistance. She was a quarterback, the coach. We were the players,” says Ernest Green, one of the Little Rock Nine, the group of students who integrated Central High School.

“She was conditioned to know that the civil rights movement was moving forward,” Sybil Jordan Hampton, one of the first African American students to graduate from Central High, says. Daisy Bates helped drive the movement in Little Rock.

Challenging Authority
Bates and her husband, L.C., were a team: She was the president of the Arkansas NAACP; he was its regional director. He was the publisher of the largest black newspaper in the state; she was his star reporter.

“The reason they were larger than life … Daisy and L.C. were always challenging whatever the prevailing attitude of white authority, of segregation, of restrictions of Jim Crow,” Green says

The story began in 1954 when the Supreme Court called for an end to segregated schools.
Daisy Bates and the NAACP took the Little Rock school board to court.
At the time, Green was attending Dunbar High School, the all-black in Little Rock.
“Daisy was in the papers indicating that she was going to challenge the Little Rock School Board to adhere to the ‘54 decision. So the reason that they put together this plan was because Daisy forced them to put the plan together.”

Recruiting Students to Go First
The plan could work only if there were students — children really — willing to be the first to possibly face violence and defy the segregationists.
Daisy Bates helped recruit them, bright kids the school board couldn’t turn down.
“I’ve known Ms. Bates since I was probably two years old and I was a paper carrier for their newspaper from the time I was six,” says Hampton. She was one of the children considered, though she wasn’t selected as one of the original nine.

“I remember that she talked to my parents at an NAACP meeting,” Hampton says. “And she told my parents that she felt that my brother and I both would be good candidates. And she said to my parents that she hoped that she would have their support in our stepping forward.”

Daisy Bates did win some parents over — even as the school board was pressuring them to keep their children at the all-black high school.

Star Quality
“You really needed a woman to go and talk with families and to give the assurance that the students were going to have a touch point of comfort,” Hampton says. “But she also was a very beautiful woman and the national press and other people found it just wonderful to have this star-quality black woman.”

Bates wore high heels and stylish dresses, and her friend Annie Abrams recalls her as one of the most glamorous, sophisticated black women in town.

Bates had no children of her own, but she was “hungry for children and children were attracted to her because she was a Lena Horne in our town.”
It was unusual, in an era when black leaders were almost always men, for a black woman to take a leading role — especially in a drama that was playing out on the national stage.

‘Blood Will Run in the Streets’
The showdown came in the fall of 1957.
Arkansas Gov. Orval Faubus vowed “blood will run in the streets” if black students tried to enter Central High.

On the first day of school, Faubus ordered the Arkansas National Guard to turn the students away. Some two weeks passed and the nation waited to see what President Eisenhower would do.

Sending in the Troops
Minniejean Brown Trickey and Ernest Greene, two of the Little Rock Nine, remember the scene inside Daisy Bates’ house.

“The house was buzzing with media and people in and out,” Trickey says. “Things were happening. I mean, [civil rights lawyer] Thurgood Marshall was his amazing self. He explained things to us at a certain point and there were quite a few great minds there who were passing on information and laughing, talking.”

Green adds, “What I remember at Ms. Bates’ house is that you had all of this drama going on, but we were still teenagers. We were worried about how we were going to look getting into the jeep. Why couldn’t we have two jeeps, instead of one. And Daisy said: ‘Look, this is a very important moment. The fact that the president of the United States has sent the United States Army here to escort you into school means that this government is finally serious about school desegregation.’”

Eisenhower had acted, sending in the 101st Airborne to escort five boys and four girls to high school.

The next days and weeks, Daisy Bates’ house was still headquarters for the Little Rock Nine.

By week’s end, Central High had been integrated.
Green — the only senior in the group — graduated the following spring.
Martin Luther King Jr. attended the graduation ceremony. Daisy Bates could not. Her face and name were better-known in the city than King’s, and her presence might have stirred violence.

A Complicated Legacy
Fifty years later, her legacy is complicated.
Trickey, one of the Little Rock Nine, says that Bates, who wrote a book in 1962, took too much credit for her role in the drama.
“Actually I think she has in her writing expanded what her role was with us,” Trickey says. “And part of that is unfortunate because she emerged as the spokesperson for the Little Rock Nine. And our parents, by and large, were silenced.
“I’ll tell you one thing: it was my dad who lost his job,” Trickey says. “It was my mother who got the terror calls. It was my mother who was frightened for my life, and they were the heroes of this.”
Central High graduate Sybil Jordan Hampton thinks Daisy Bates was also heroic.
“Mrs. Bates was an extraordinarily complex woman,” Jordan says. “An incident thrust her into the forefront of a movement. And I always have felt that Mrs. Bates was a tragic figure.”
Fifty years on, the woman who had been at the center of the Little Rock movement is barely remembered. Her home, where it all happened, was nearly lost after her husband passed away and money was tight.

Daisy Bates died in 1999. She became the first — and still only — African-American to lie in state in the Arkansas Capitol, the same building once occupied by Gov. Faubus.
On that same day, the Little Rock Nine were honored at the White House by Bill Clinton, the president from Arkansas.

by Juan Williams

http://www.itvs.org/films/daisy-bates

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=14563865

ukulelerave:

such a needed campaign. i wish they’d have included native americans as well, though, as cultural appropriation of them in costumes is just as awfully common.

^ I agree.

dangerlevelnine:

adriofthedead:

thepascall:

sonic-hip-attack:

that-cherokee-bitch:

deanpaints:

On January 12, 2010, one day after his 18th birthday, CAPA High School honors student Jordan Trent Miles was ambushed by three plain clothes Pittsburgh police officers, who failed to identify themselves and approached him aggressively. The officers did not say “Stop! Police!”, they jumped out of an unmarked vehicle, one of them yelling “Where’s your money? Where’s the drugs? Where’s the gun?” Miles, never before in trouble with the police and thinking he was being robbed, began to run, and slipped on the icy sidewalk. The officers overtook Miles and administered a brutal beating that left him unrecognizable, ripping dreadlocks out of his head, and continuing to beat him as he lay on the ground after their initial assault, stammering the Lord’s Prayer. There can be no explaining away or excusing what was done to Miles.

The police officers lied about what happened, claiming there was a bulge in his pocket they assumed was a gun but “turned out to be a Mountain Dew bottle”. No bottle was ever entered into evidence, and Jordan and his friends will tell you he doesn’t even drink the soda. The officers also attempted to claim a neighbor reported him as a prowler and attempted to bring assault charges against Miles, which were tossed out of court when the neighbor said she did no such thing. Despite all this, the City of Pittsburgh went on to reward these violent officers with a commendation and, during their suspension, paid them more than they earned while working. Meanwhile, the Pittsburgh DA has not brought charges and the Justice Department announced on May 4th, 2011 that it would not prosecute the three officers. The mayor and police chief announced on May 5th that the three officers would be returning to work.

“I feel that my son was racially profiled,” Terez Miles said. “It’s a rough neighborhood; it was after dark. … They assumed he was up to no good because he’s black. My son, he knows nothing about the streets at all. He’s had a very sheltered life, he’s very quiet, he doesn’t know police officers sit in cars and stalk people like that.”

http://justiceforjordanmiles.com/

this is exactly what i’m talking about.

look at the pathetic amount of notes on this. why can’t this get coverage? i don’t give a shit about another missing white girl.

Omg :-/

This… there are no words.

My heart goes out to this boy and his family. These are the kind of things that make me absolutely sick. 

jesus christ what the hell

this stuff needs to stop.

thedailywhat:

This Is All Kinds Of Wrong of the Day: On Sunday, September 11th, two passenger planes had to be escorted to their destination by F-16 jets after suspicious activity was reported on board.
One of those flights, Frontier Flight 623, landed at Detroit’s Metropolitan Airport, and was met on the runway by FBI agents and a SWAT unit. Three passengers — two men of Indian descent and a woman — were removed from coach in bracelets, and taken into custody.
The female detainee, as it turns out, was Jewish Arab blogger Shoshana Hebshi.
“Silly me,” Hebshi writes in a post describing her ordeal, “I thought flying on 9/11 would be easy.” Hebshi says she had never been profiled before, despite the Arab features she got from her Saudi Arabian dad.
“Because I am my father’s daughter I am aware of the possibility of anti-Arab and anti-Semitic sentiments that have increased dramatically,” she says, “but luckily  no members of my family nor myself have had to endure what so many others have gone through in this country and throughout the world.”
All that changed Sunday when Hebshi was handcuffed, locked up, and strip-searched — all because a passenger aboard her plane thought she looked suspicious.
“You understand why we have to do this, right? It’s for our own protection,” said the female officer responsible for administering the search. “Because I am so violent,” Hebshi thought to herself. “And pulling me off an airplane, handcuffing me  and patting me down against a squad car didn’t offer enough protection.  They also needed to make sure all my orifices were free and clear.”
After all was said and done, an FBI agent apologized to Hebshi and thanked her for her cooperation. “It’s 9/11 and people are seeing ghosts,” the agent told her, adding that the FBI “had to act on a report of suspicious behavior, and this is what the reaction looks like.”
But to Hebshi, who says she won’t be flying on September 11 any time soon, these excuses ring hollow:

In the aftermath of my events on Sept. 11, 2011, I feel  violated, humiliated and sure that I was taken from the plane simply  because of my appearance…We live in a complicated world that, to me, seems to have reached a  breaking point. The real test will be if we decide to break free from  our fears and hatred and truly try to be good people who practice  compassion–even toward those who hate.

[ap via lasvegassun / shebshi.]

thedailywhat:

This Is All Kinds Of Wrong of the Day: On Sunday, September 11th, two passenger planes had to be escorted to their destination by F-16 jets after suspicious activity was reported on board.

One of those flights, Frontier Flight 623, landed at Detroit’s Metropolitan Airport, and was met on the runway by FBI agents and a SWAT unit. Three passengers — two men of Indian descent and a woman — were removed from coach in bracelets, and taken into custody.

The female detainee, as it turns out, was Jewish Arab blogger Shoshana Hebshi.

“Silly me,” Hebshi writes in a post describing her ordeal, “I thought flying on 9/11 would be easy.” Hebshi says she had never been profiled before, despite the Arab features she got from her Saudi Arabian dad.

“Because I am my father’s daughter I am aware of the possibility of anti-Arab and anti-Semitic sentiments that have increased dramatically,” she says, “but luckily  no members of my family nor myself have had to endure what so many others have gone through in this country and throughout the world.”

All that changed Sunday when Hebshi was handcuffed, locked up, and strip-searched — all because a passenger aboard her plane thought she looked suspicious.

“You understand why we have to do this, right? It’s for our own protection,” said the female officer responsible for administering the search. “Because I am so violent,” Hebshi thought to herself. “And pulling me off an airplane, handcuffing me and patting me down against a squad car didn’t offer enough protection. They also needed to make sure all my orifices were free and clear.”

After all was said and done, an FBI agent apologized to Hebshi and thanked her for her cooperation. “It’s 9/11 and people are seeing ghosts,” the agent told her, adding that the FBI “had to act on a report of suspicious behavior, and this is what the reaction looks like.”

But to Hebshi, who says she won’t be flying on September 11 any time soon, these excuses ring hollow:

In the aftermath of my events on Sept. 11, 2011, I feel violated, humiliated and sure that I was taken from the plane simply because of my appearance…We live in a complicated world that, to me, seems to have reached a breaking point. The real test will be if we decide to break free from our fears and hatred and truly try to be good people who practice compassion–even toward those who hate.

[ap via lasvegassun / shebshi.]

If you are a woman, if you are a person of color, if you are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender, if you are a person of size, if you are a person of intelligence, if you are a person of integrity, then you are considered a minority in this world.

Margaret Cho (via goforthandagitate)

cocobutterblues:

I am constantly seeing people reblog things on my minifeed charges racism when they are in fact, not racist at all.  We’ve been taught to believe that racism is the “idea” that one race is superior to all others.  This is not racism.  This is racial pride. Ethnic pride is  almost innate; Most of us are bred from very young to be proud of our culture, heritage, history.  White people who believe the white race is superior is not racist at all; they are misinformed. Black people who believe the black race is superior are…correct in that assessment.  But that’s another blog for another day…..
People should recognize the difference between prejudice, racism, cultural insensitivity, and flat out ignorance.  By knowing the difference between the 4, people are less likely to charge racism (a serious charge) at a isolated moment of ignorance, or prejudice. Thus, when actual racism does in fact take place, the point can be more easily validated. 
(of course this my theory/take on racism.  You are certainly free to your opinion). 
Flat out ignorance-this involves those people who genuinely don’t know anything about black culture due to their lack of exposure to people of color.  All they know of black people is what they see on television.  They grew up in predominately white neighborhoods, went to predominately white schools, churches.  Very little dealings with people of color.  These are the type of people that may ask a woman of color, “Is your hair real?” Or “Do all black women wear weave?” Before you code switch on their ass (code switch= going from Tina to Taneeka in .02 seconds), calmly explain to her that all women, black and white, wear weave. Also explain to her that is very rude to ask someone if she wears weave or not.  It’s not her business. But, as to avoid being labeled “aggressive” or having a bad attitude, politely let her know that yes (or no) this is weave. Make light of it and move on.  You have avoided an awkward confrontation. Most importantly though, her ass has been warned.  People who suffer from flat ignorance get 2 warnings, after that, Get ‘em. 
Prejudice-Most people who charge that people are racist are actually prejudice.  I’m prejudice. I’ll admit it.  Every unfamiliar space I go to, I scan the room to determine the “white to black ratio.” ie, for every one white person I see in this room, I need to see 2 blacks.  If the W2B ratio is off, I am uncomfortable.  I would imagine whites do the same thing.  Black people enjoy being around black people. White people enjoy being around white people.  That’s why there are black barbers and white barbers.  That’s why there are black churches and white churches. I personally, do not mind being around my own people. My problem becomes when there are mandates and laws in place that restrict me to these places.  See: Racism.  I look at it like this, If I worked with 2 black people and 2 white people, and I had tickets to a Jill Scott concert, I’m inviting the black people. Am I being flat out ignorant assuming the two white people don’t like Jill Scott? Of course. But that’s the price you pay when discussions about race are not encouraged by rather trivialized. 
Cultural Insensitivity: This one is very tricky.  I honestly believe that most white people exhibit cultural insensitivity than actual racism.  Cultural insensitivity (my definition) involves being unaware of the cultural traits, behaviors, and attitudes of a ethnicity other than your own.  CI is largely driven by stereotypes and generalizations. I’ve heard of people (black people) hosting dinner parties and…get this….not seasoning the food because white people were coming.  Girl, what? Then you ask them where they heard that at; “I always heard white people don’t season their food.” Now, everybody-black and white-sucking down you cardboard chicken based on an ignorant assumption perpetuated by an idiotic generalization.  When NBC studios decided to serve fried chicken and collard greens in celebration of Black History Month? Classic case of cultural insensitivity.  Having children make rain sticks and feather helmets as they “learn” about Native Americans. Insensitivity.  As it pertains to culture.  I once worked at a daycare center that had a teacher teaching her pre-schoolers about China…by making sushi rolls.  Not only was this culturally insensitive, but inaccurate; sushi is a Japanese delicacy; not Chinese. 
Racism- First and foremost, people need to understand how serious  this charge is.  To label someone a racist, you are actually saying, “You have created a system so complex in nature, that only a select few of privileged individuals are actually able to benefit from the policies set forth by you.” Seriously, how many people are capable of that? We be calling people racist that don’t have 1/1000th of the brain capacity it would take to perpetuate a system as complex as racism.  Racism (in my opinion, of course ) is a complex system of oppression by the usage of laws, public and private funds,  government resources, law enforcement, judicial system, media, and educational system.  Racism often is covert, rather than overt; By the time people have realized they’ve become the victims of racism, they’ve been oppressed for so long that little can actually be done.  Racial Steering is a prime example of racism.  California’s passing of Prop14 in 1964 is a prime example of racism.  Disparities in prison sentences between blacks and whites.  The Tuskegee Experiment.  Tulsa, Oaklahoma bombings. Martin Lee Anderson’s death and trial.  NCAA sanctions on HBCUs vs PWI.  The institution of slavery. The peonage system.  Police Brutality.  The Welfare system.  All are systematic forms of oppression using government resources to oppress a group.  It is also for these very reason why I vehemently deny any charges that a person of color can be racist. Blacks can most definitely be ignorant. We are prejudice (with good reason). We can be culturally insensitive.  But racist? Highly unlikely. If (and I do mean IF) people of color were to ever have some type of dominion over white people, because blacks have been oppressed to astronomical proportions, IF blacks decided to reciprocate the treatment  they’ve received from white people to white people, would they not be justified? Would they not be “racist” but rather just simply evening the playing field? Your call.  
Yeah this is just my take.  I think people, black and white, need to be careful using the “racism” charge when identifying systems of ignorance, prejudice, and CI.
im done.

cocobutterblues:

I am constantly seeing people reblog things on my minifeed charges racism when they are in fact, not racist at all.  We’ve been taught to believe that racism is the “idea” that one race is superior to all others.  This is not racism.  This is racial pride. Ethnic pride is  almost innate; Most of us are bred from very young to be proud of our culture, heritage, history.  White people who believe the white race is superior is not racist at all; they are misinformed. Black people who believe the black race is superior are…correct in that assessment.  But that’s another blog for another day…..

People should recognize the difference between prejudice, racism, cultural insensitivity, and flat out ignorance.  By knowing the difference between the 4, people are less likely to charge racism (a serious charge) at a isolated moment of ignorance, or prejudice. Thus, when actual racism does in fact take place, the point can be more easily validated. 

(of course this my theory/take on racism.  You are certainly free to your opinion). 

Flat out ignorance-this involves those people who genuinely don’t know anything about black culture due to their lack of exposure to people of color.  All they know of black people is what they see on television.  They grew up in predominately white neighborhoods, went to predominately white schools, churches.  Very little dealings with people of color.  These are the type of people that may ask a woman of color, “Is your hair real?” Or “Do all black women wear weave?” Before you code switch on their ass (code switch= going from Tina to Taneeka in .02 seconds), calmly explain to her that all women, black and white, wear weave. Also explain to her that is very rude to ask someone if she wears weave or not.  It’s not her business. But, as to avoid being labeled “aggressive” or having a bad attitude, politely let her know that yes (or no) this is weave. Make light of it and move on.  You have avoided an awkward confrontation. Most importantly though, her ass has been warned.  People who suffer from flat ignorance get 2 warnings, after that, Get ‘em. 

Prejudice-Most people who charge that people are racist are actually prejudice.  I’m prejudice. I’ll admit it.  Every unfamiliar space I go to, I scan the room to determine the “white to black ratio.” ie, for every one white person I see in this room, I need to see 2 blacks.  If the W2B ratio is off, I am uncomfortable.  I would imagine whites do the same thing.  Black people enjoy being around black people. White people enjoy being around white people.  That’s why there are black barbers and white barbers.  That’s why there are black churches and white churches. I personally, do not mind being around my own people. My problem becomes when there are mandates and laws in place that restrict me to these places.  See: Racism.  I look at it like this, If I worked with 2 black people and 2 white people, and I had tickets to a Jill Scott concert, I’m inviting the black people. Am I being flat out ignorant assuming the two white people don’t like Jill Scott? Of course. But that’s the price you pay when discussions about race are not encouraged by rather trivialized. 

Cultural Insensitivity: This one is very tricky.  I honestly believe that most white people exhibit cultural insensitivity than actual racism.  Cultural insensitivity (my definition) involves being unaware of the cultural traits, behaviors, and attitudes of a ethnicity other than your own.  CI is largely driven by stereotypes and generalizations. I’ve heard of people (black people) hosting dinner parties and…get this….not seasoning the food because white people were coming.  Girl, what? Then you ask them where they heard that at; “I always heard white people don’t season their food.” Now, everybody-black and white-sucking down you cardboard chicken based on an ignorant assumption perpetuated by an idiotic generalization.  When NBC studios decided to serve fried chicken and collard greens in celebration of Black History Month? Classic case of cultural insensitivity.  Having children make rain sticks and feather helmets as they “learn” about Native Americans. Insensitivity.  As it pertains to culture.  I once worked at a daycare center that had a teacher teaching her pre-schoolers about China…by making sushi rolls.  Not only was this culturally insensitive, but inaccurate; sushi is a Japanese delicacy; not Chinese. 

Racism- First and foremost, people need to understand how serious  this charge is.  To label someone a racist, you are actually saying, “You have created a system so complex in nature, that only a select few of privileged individuals are actually able to benefit from the policies set forth by you.” Seriously, how many people are capable of that? We be calling people racist that don’t have 1/1000th of the brain capacity it would take to perpetuate a system as complex as racism.  Racism (in my opinion, of course ) is a complex system of oppression by the usage of laws, public and private funds,  government resources, law enforcement, judicial system, media, and educational system.  Racism often is covert, rather than overt; By the time people have realized they’ve become the victims of racism, they’ve been oppressed for so long that little can actually be done.  Racial Steering is a prime example of racism.  California’s passing of Prop14 in 1964 is a prime example of racism.  Disparities in prison sentences between blacks and whites.  The Tuskegee Experiment.  Tulsa, Oaklahoma bombings. Martin Lee Anderson’s death and trial.  NCAA sanctions on HBCUs vs PWI.  The institution of slavery. The peonage system.  Police Brutality.  The Welfare system.  All are systematic forms of oppression using government resources to oppress a group.  It is also for these very reason why I vehemently deny any charges that a person of color can be racist. Blacks can most definitely be ignorant. We are prejudice (with good reason). We can be culturally insensitive.  But racist? Highly unlikely. If (and I do mean IF) people of color were to ever have some type of dominion over white people, because blacks have been oppressed to astronomical proportions, IF blacks decided to reciprocate the treatment  they’ve received from white people to white people, would they not be justified? Would they not be “racist” but rather just simply evening the playing field? Your call.  

Yeah this is just my take.  I think people, black and white, need to be careful using the “racism” charge when identifying systems of ignorance, prejudice, and CI.

im done.